Colleen Griffin - RE/MAX Vision



Posted by Colleen Griffin on 1/22/2018

Getting a professional inspection is one of the most important parts of closing on a home. An inspection can save you endless time and money if it catches repairs that need to be made, and it can draw your attention to any problems that could be dangerous to you and your family.

Many buyers, especially those who are buying a home for the first time, arenít sure what to expect during a home inspection. They might have questions that theyíre afraid to ask the inspector, or they might feel like they should be asking questions but donít know the right ones to ask.

In this article, weíll give you the rundown on the home inspection process. Weíll explain how to get started, what to expect on inspection day, and what to do with your findings.

Contingency clauses

Before closing on a home, itís important to make sure your offer involves a contingency clause, otherwise known as a ďdue diligence contingency.Ē This section of your contract gives you the right to perform a home inspection within a given number of days.

Sellers may inform you that they have recently had the home inspected and even offer to show you the results of the inspection. However, it is best practice to have your own inspection performed with a trusted professional.

After your offer is accepted, you should begin calling and getting quotes from inspectors immediately.

Before the inspection

Once youíve considered your options of inspectors and chosen an inspector, itís time to schedule your inspection. Both you and your real estate agent should attend the inspection.

Youíll both have the opportunity to ask questions. However, itís a good idea to write down your minor questions and ask them before or after the inspection so that the professional youíve hired is able to focus on their work to do the best possible job inspecting your future home.

During the inspection

The inspection itself is pretty straightforward. Your inspector will examine the exterior and interior of your home, including several vital components and then will provide you with a report of their findings.

They will inform you of repairs that need to be made now, parts of the home that should be monitored for future repairs, and anything that poses a safety concern to you and your family.

The parts of your home the inspector will review include:

  • Roof

  • Exterior Walls

  • Foundation

  • Garage

  • Land grading

  • Plumbing

  • Electrical

  • Heating, ventilation, air conditioning

  • Appliances

There are some things your inspection wonít include. For example, mold, termite damage, and other issues that arenít easily observable without causing damage might be missed by your inspector and will require a specialist.

After the inspection

Once the inspection is complete, you will have the chance to ask any remaining questions. You can review the findings of your inspection report and make decisions about how you want to handle any repairs that need to be made.

You may choose to ask the seller to make the repairs noted in your inspection report. If they refuse, you can withdraw from your contract at any time.


Ultimately, the choice will be yours what to do with the findings from the inspection. But having one can save you immeasurable money on impending repairs that you may not have been aware of.





Posted by Colleen Griffin on 10/16/2017

Itís easy to fall in love with a house if it has all the features youíre looking for. However, itís important not to ignore the qualities of the neighborhood the house is in as well.

The state of the surrounding neighborhood is important for many homeowners. Youíll use the local amenities, walk on the sidewalks, drive on the roads, and eventually even set the price of your home based partially on the price of those surrounding it.

In this article, weíre going to discuss some of the reasons you should pay attention to the neighborhood when shopping for homes, and what qualities to look for to find a place that has both high quality of life and resale value.  

Neighborhood Inspection 101

There are a number of things youíll want to learn about a neighborhood before you move in. Some of them you can observe with your own eye, some you can find online via public records, and others will require talking to the locals to see what their experience has been.

Things to observe

When you go to visit a home, set aside some time beforehand to drive around the neighborhood. Check out the roads, sidewalks, and the general state of the neighborhood. Boarded up houses and closed businesses arenít always a sign of doom and gloom, but it can give you insight into the pricing of some homes and give you some negotiating power.

If you love the house and feel okay about the neighborhood swing by during rush hour, if possible. This will give you a sense of traffic and how long it will take you to get to work from your new home.

If youíre moving into a city, itís also a good idea to check out the after-hours scene. If a peaceful evening at home is what you seek, it will be a good idea to know ahead of time if your street comes alive at night.

Things to research

Itís a good idea to get a feel for the local culture before buying a home to see if it fits with your lifestyle. Are businesses closed on Sundays? Are there community events and clubs that you ur your family would be interested in? You can find most information online through Facebook groups, library websites, and local newspapers.

If youíre concerned with crime, you can find local data online. Similarly, records are available for local schools, such as where the townís test scores land compared to state and national averages.

Talk to the neighbors

The most practical way to learn about a neighborhood is to ask the people who live there. Theyíll be able to tell you how it has changed over the years, which will give you a sense of where the neighborhood is headed. They can tell you whether itís a neighborhood filled with young families or aging retirees, and will likely be able to let you know if there are any problems in the neighborhood.

Aside from the local culture, you should ask your potential new neighbors about the infrastructure. Do they have frequent power issues? Is there often noisy construction, or have there been potholes that havenít been filled for years? You can learn a lot from the people who have lived in a neighborhood for multiple years.





Posted by Colleen Griffin on 7/16/2017

The home inspection may seem like a standard thing that you need to go through in the process of buying a home. Really, youíre paying for the home inspection, and itís a huge opportunity for you. As a home buyer, you should look at the home inspection as an educational event for homeowners. Youíll learn a lot about the history of the property that youíll be living in. From water that may have been present in the basement to a leaky roof, youíll get to know your new home and how everything works.


When you hire your home inspector, he or she may seem like they are talking to experts. For this reason, itís a good idea to ask questions during the inspection so that you can clarify what the inspector is talking bout.


Is This Problem Urgent?


Itís a good idea to see how soon any problems in the house need to be fixed. If the roof needs to be replaced within 3-6 months and your finances are tight, itís something that youíll want to know about. While home inspectors will reserve their opinions about a property overall, professionally, they can tell you how big of an issue certain things are. You may need to hire a certified professional who specializes in a certain area like plumbing or electricity for further evaluation in many cases. For your own knowledge, itís a good idea to know what needs to be done around the property and when.             


Take Notes


Youíre never going to remember where everything is in the house on the first pass. Itís a good idea to carry a notepad with you when youíre going through the home. Make notes of any major issues, where they are, and how to fix them. This way, even after the inspection report is sent, youíll have something to refer back to.  


Is This At The End Of Its Lifespan?


Your home inspector will take a look at all of the moving parts of the home that youíre about to purchase. This includes the appliances. Is the dishwasher on its last leg? Will you need a new refrigerator very soon? Is that creak in the floor more than just a problem with a floorboard? If you find out what to expect from both the major and minor issues in the home, youíll have a better idea of what to expect from the property overall. 


Home inspectors give you an overview of the condition of a home. Inspectors will tell you that there is no home that comes completely clean when it comes to an inspection. Even a brand new home that was just built will have some issues. While it may not be the most fun to find out that your new home needs a new roof, at least you and your realtor will know what needs to be brought to the negotiation table if you decide to go through with the purchase of the home.







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